Magyar Zene Music Quarterly

 

 

 

 

Magyar Zene

Hungarian Language Music Quarterly

 

Vol. 54 , No. 3 - August 2016

 

 

Contents

 

Articles

 

MÁRTA PAPP  
A Háztűznéző esete
Muszorgszkij operatöredékének két verziója
241
The Story of The Marriage
The Two Versions of Musorgsky’s Unfinished Opera (Abstract)
259
SETH MONAHAN  
„Megpróbáltalak megörökíteni…”
Mahler Hatodik szimfóniájának „Alma- témája” újragondolva – 2. rész
260
„I Have Tried to Capture You…”
Rethinking the „Alma” Theme from Mahler’s Sixth Symphony – Part 2 (Abstract)
288
JÜRGEN HUNKEMÖLLER  
Műfajok, témák, toposzok Bartók zenéjében
III. Korál
289

Short Contributions

 

SÁNDOR KOVÁCS  
A másik Búcsúszimfónia 305
The Other Farewell Symphony (Abstract) 310
ZSUZSANNA DOMOKOS  
Liszt Ferenc Esztergomi miséje Mosonyi Mihály interpretációjában 311
Liszt’s Graner Messe in Mihály Mosonyi’s Transcription (Abstract) 316
KLÁRA GULYÁSNÉ SOMOGYI  
„…szükséges a Pest- budai Zenedének a dolgok élére állani…”
Mosonyi Mihály cikksorozata a magyar zenei műveltség felemeléséért
317
„…. the Pest- Buda Music School Must be a Leader….”
Mihály Mosonyi’s Series of Articles to Raise the Standard of Hungarian Musical
Culture
(Abstract)
323

Work in Progress

 

JUDIT ZSOVÁR  
G. F. Händel és Anna Maria Strada művészi szimbiózisa 324
G. F. Händel and Anna Maria Strada’s Artistic Symbiosis (Abstract) 343

Reviews

 

FERENC JÁNOS SZABÓ  
Goldmark Károly élete és művei – osztrák nézőpontból

Johann Hofer: Carl Goldmark. Komponist der Ringstraßenzeit.
Wien: Edition Steinbauer, 2015

344
MÁRTA RUDASNÉ BAJCSAY  
„Tetszik- e az angyali vígasság?”

Bodor Anikó–Paksa Katalin: Vajdasági magyar népdalok V. Jeles napi szokások és jeles időszakok énekei. Újvidék: Forum Könyvkiadó, 2016;
Zenta: Vajdasági Magyar Művelődési Intézet, 2016.

354

 

 

The whole issue (pdf)

 

 

 

ABSTRACTS

 

 

MÁRTA PAPP

The Story of The Marriage
The Two Versions of Musorgsky’s Unfinished Opera

 

The composer’s two completed but very much differing versions of Boris Godunov still today pose many serious questions to both performers and analysts alike.
Few people know that Musorgsky also completely revised his operatic fragment The Marriage that immediately preceded Boris, and furthermore hardly a trace exists in musicological literature of the fact that The Child composed at that time, which later became the first item of the song cycle The Nursery (with the title of With Nurse), was also the subject of a revision. What connection there is between the versions of these three works and how Musorgsky’s operatic style developed in 1868 are questions to which the present article seeks the answer.

 

Márta Papp studied musicology from 1969 to 1974 at the Budapest Liszt Academy with Bence Szabolcsi, György Kroó and László Somfai. As a musicologist she is an expert on Russian music and has published books and studies on Modest Musorgsky, 19th century Russian music, the pianist Sviatoslav Richter and contacts between Hungarian and Russian composers and compositions. From 1972 to 2011 she was a producer for the Bartók channel of Hungarian Radio.

 

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SETH MONAHAN

„I Have Tried to Capture You…”
Rethinking the „Alma” Theme from Mahler’s Sixth Symphony – Part 2

 

Since the 1940s, Mahler’s Sixth Symphony has been transmitted with an informal ‘domestic’ program centered on several claims first made in Alma Mahler’s Erinnerungen. In the work, she writes, Gustav meant to depict their children (in the Scherzo), himself (in the Finale), and finally her, in the first movement’s swooning secondary theme. Though critics have almost universally accepted Alma’s anecdote, few have seriously asked the important question of what such a portrait would be doing in Mahler’s most expressly tragic symphony. In this study I offer a hermeneutic perspective on the Sixth that concedes the possible truth of Alma’s anecdote but which challenges the conventional assumption that such a spousal tribute should best be understood as a one- sided testament to Mahler’s newfound nuptial bliss. After examining the theme’s reception history and Mahler’s domestic circumstances during the symphony’s composition, I explore the ways in which the first movement’s sonata narrative – a protracted conflict between (and reconciliation of) its two gendered subjects – suggestively mirrors the prevailing psychodynamics of Mahler’s strained marriage. At the end of the essay I propose how this revised hearing of the opening movement might prompt a reimagining of the entire Sixth as a projected or imagined ‘domestic tragedy’, with special focus on the intertextual links between the work’s outer movements and also between the cataclysmic finale and the penitentially anguished portions of the Third Symphony’s ‘Armer Kinder Betterlied’.


Seth Monahan is Associate Professor of Music Theory at the Eastman School of Music in Rochester, New York and the author of Mahler’s Symphonic Sonatas (OUP, 2015). His essays on musical form, meaning, and epistemology have appeared in Music Theory Spectrum, Music Analysis, the Journal of Music Theory, Music Theory Online, 19th- Century Music, the Journal of the American Musicological Society, Intégral, the Journal of Music Theory Pedagogy, and several multi- author volumes. His article ‘Action and Agency Revisited’ received the 2015 Society for Music Theory Emerging Scholar Award.

 

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JÜRGEN HUNKEMÖLLER

Gattungen, Sujets, Topoi Choral

 

The German original of this text appeared as part of the author's book entitled Bauernmusik und Klangmagie. Bartók- Studien (Hildesheim: Georg Olms Verlag, 2013), Chapter 6, ‘Choral’ (137–156). The previous issue of Magyar Zene (2016/2) included two other sections from the same chapter: ‘Klage’ and ‘Scherzo’ (189–213).

 

Jürgen Hunkemöller (born 1939) studied music pedagogy at the Hochschule Heidelberg, musicology, German language and literature, philosophy, and art history at the Universities of Köln and Heidelberg. Between 1966 and 1968 he lived in Paris for researchwork. He received his Ph. D. in Heidelberg in 1968. Between 1968 and 1973 he worked as Reinhold Hammerstein’s and Ewald Jammers’s assistent at the Heidelberg University. From 1969 until 2012 he was professor on music history at the Musikhochschule Mannheim (earlier Heidelberg), and also from 1973 to 2004 professor on musicology at he University of Education Schwäbisch Gmünd. He was guest professor and lecturer at the Universities of Heidelberg, Kiel, and Bern as well as at the Liszt Ferenc University of Music in Budapest. The center of his scholarly interest are music history of the 18- 20th centuries, jazz and its reception, and music and religion.

 

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SÁNDOR KOVÁCS

The Other Farewell Symphony

 

The name ‘farewell’ has over time become attached to the Symphony No. 45 in F# minor, even though there are good reasons for its being connected with the last of the London symphonies in D major. It is not coincidence that in the last movement Haydn evokes the exotic atmosphere of his distant homeland with a folk song. Another melody delineates a gesture of farewell. Regarding the slow movement Hermann Kretzschmar has already suggested that it has a concealed programme. The present study aims to decipher this with the aid of a formal analysis following László Dobszay’s basic principles of form. As a result it would appear that the movement takes a look back over the composer’s career and casts a glance at life beyond the realities of this world. In addition actual quotations in the work are listed along with those alleged to be there.

 

Sándor Kovács (b.1949) studied piano and musicology at the Ferenc Liszt Academy of Music, Budapest. After graduating he taught there, becoming head of the Department of Musicology in 2005. In addition he worked at the Bartók Archives at the Institute for Musicology of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences (until 2001), taught and still teaches at the Béla Bartók Musical Institute at Miskolc University (heading the Institute from 2001 to 2005), and since 1997 has been the editor and programme planner for Hungarian Radio’s weekly New Musical News.

 

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ZSUZSANNA DOMOKOS

Liszt’s Graner Messe in Mihály Mosonyi’s Transcription

 

Mosonyi’s transcription of the Graner Messe by Liszt is symbolic evidence of the composer’s admiration of Liszt. Mosonyi belonged among Liszt’s most devoted friends and supporters in Hungary. Liszt also had a high opinion of Mosonyi’s compositions, he declared him to be the best Hungarian composer of church music of his time. Mosonyi not only made the piano four- hand transcription of Liszt’s mass, but he himself played the double bass at its first performance. The article traces the genesis of the transcription (1860–1872) following Liszt’s correspondence, the two editions of the transcription in Liszt’s time, and Mosonyi’s article on Liszt in 1865 in the Zenészeti Lapok. The transcription by Mosonyi won Liszt’s highest appreciation to the extent that Liszt later included it in his 1877 catalogue of his own works. The way Mosonyi made the transcription of the mass is very similar to those by Liszt which aim to reflect the very spirit of the original composition. The article also gives some examples from it.

 

Zsuzsanna Domokos graudated from the Faculty of Musicology at the Budapest Liszt Academy in 1987. From 1986 she was a research assistant in the Liszt Academy’s Franz Liszt Memorial Musuem and Research
Centre, where in 2002 she bacame the deputy director and in 2009 the director. In 1993 she obtained a post- graduate doctoral degree and in 2009 was awarded her PhD. The subjects of her theses were Borodin’s opera Prince Igor and the influence on Liszt’s music of 19th century Palestrina reception in Rome. She has been awarded Hungarian state scholarships to undertake research in Moscow, St Petersburg, Vienna, and Rome. She has delivered musicological papers at conferences in Hungary and abroad (Austria, Germany, Italy, Finland, France and Slovenia). Her work has appeared in Hungarian and foreign academic journals. She has organized exhibitions and historical concerts in Humgary and abroad, and was the organizer of the Liszt birthday festivals in the Liszt Memorial Museum in 2011 and 2016. In 2014 she was awarded the Silver Raven Medal of the Los Angeles Collegium Corvinum and in 2016 Hungary’s Bence Szabolcsi prize.

 

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KLÁRA GULYÁSNÉ SOMOGYI

„…. the Pest- Buda Music School Must be a Leader….”
Mihály Mosonyi’s Series of Articles to Raise the Standard of Hungarian Musical
Culture

 

Mihály Mosonyi (1815–1870) considered it his task to shape the musical culture of his time using every means available. As a composer, teacher and in the first half of the 1860s as a journal editor and contributor, he took every opportunity to achieve his goal. Among those who figured in the early years of his musical life were the professors at the Musicians’ Federation Music School, and although he did not teach there, he was well aquainted with its work and the position it occupied in musical life. Hence in a series of four articles published in Zenészeti Lapok [Musical Pages] he described his ideas which could be realized by the Music School giving a lead in their direction. He suggests that they produce and publish a text book on singing ‘in folk- popular style’, a piano tutor, an organ tutor and handbook, together with a textbook on music theory. These books written in Hungarian would be primarily for the teachers, and act as a methodological aid in addition to their existing teaching materials. Former students of the Music School could write ’pamphlets’ on questions concerning Hungarian music, in this way assisting in the beneficial discussions. The Music School, even if not yet ready to undertake these tasks, nevertheless could do a lot on their behalf through its power and influence.

 

Klára Somogyi is a librarian and book historian. She studied at the Juhász Gyula Teacher Training College in Szeged and at the arts faculty of ELTE University in Budapest. After a short period as a teacher she became a librarian at the Liszt Academy in Budapest, where she still works. She was in the Central Library until she moved to the separate Library of Musical Research following its opening. There she dealt with the cataloguing of the 19th century material, the preservation of its holdings, and primarily with researchers’ requests to do with the life and work of Liszt. Providing Information on these topics and the acquisition of collections now go hand in hand with the history of 19th century Hungarian music publishing and music teaching. On July 1st 2016 she became Chief Librarian at the Central Library of the Liszt Academy.

 

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JUDIT ZSOVÁR

G. F. Handel and Anna Maria Strada’s Artistic Symbiosis

 

Handel’s longest continuous collaboration with a leading singer took place between 1729 and 1737 with Anna Maria Strada del Pò, whom Burney defined as a soprano ‘formed by [Handel] himself and modelled on his own melodies … and he at last polished her into reputation and favour’. In the first years, Handel set Strada’s maximum limits with respect to range, agility, stamina, messa di voce and legato, which he then synchronized with the embodied character and dramatic context. This meant an important shift in Strada’s artistic profile, as Handel revealed her pathetic sense and mingled it with her dramatic vein: through the ‘care he took in composing for her, and his instructions … he rendered her equal at least to the first performer in Europe’. This process resulted in mutual transformation.

Handel discovered the multi- coloured, unlimited entity of the female soprano voice, on the one hand, and a new freedom, on the other, to apply vocal skills according to his artistic aims without pressure of vocal exhibitionism. He could experiment with asymmetric phrases or let the melody pass through the twelve semitones in the middle section of an aria, thanks to Strada’s superb intonation. Uncommon coloratura- patterns requiring a large range were linked to her voice; elsewhere her expressiveness and variety of timbre shone through the simplicity of a ten- bar lullaby. Furthermore, her powerful voice projection, together with her particularly high tessitura combined with sonorous lower notes, allowed Handel to compose richly orchestrated castrato- type arias for her. Strada’s capacity for a denser legato permeated compositional structures on a deeper level – a quality not generally found in the Handelian repertory of Faustina or Cuzzoni, nor in the composer’s later works.

 

Judit Zsovár is a PhD candidate in musicology at the Ferenc Liszt Music Academy Budapest. Her research topics are Anna Maria Strada, Handel’s prima donna, and the relations between Baroque and Romantic bel canto vocal techniques in the mirror of the soprano sfogato voice type. As a soprano, Judit made her début at the Vienna Konzerthaus with the Mozarteum Orchestra Salzburg under Ivor Bolton. She has performed Mozart and Cimarosa roles as well as Spanish music, and interprets a wideranging Baroque repertoire with harpsichordist Fanni Edôcs. Lately, she presented her singing and research by giving concert lectures in Salzburg, London, Bern, Helsinki and Budapest. She studied with Marek Rzepka and has participated in workshops by Katalin Halmai, Júlia Hamari, Krisztina Laki, Malcolm Bilson, Luca Pianca and Lorenzo Ghirlanda. Her coach is Stephen Hopkins of the Vienna State Opera. Judit held the Zoltán Kodály Scholarship and was granted the Handel Institute Research- as well as Conference Awards in 2015, the German Academic Exchange Service Scholarship (2014), and the Scholarship of the Hungarian State (2004/2005). Her article about Strada's reception in London was published in the Händel- Jahrbuch 62 (2016). Judit is participating in the project of the Austrian Academy of Sciences, on the Viennese Kärtnertor Theatre’s repertoire reconstruction between the years of 1728-1748, conducted by Dr Andrea Sommer- Mathis, and will assist Dr Reinhard Strohm from early 2017 with the upcoming volume of the Halle Handel Edition’s Scipione.

 

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