Magyar Zene Music Quarterly

 

 

 

 

Magyar Zene

Hungarian Language Music Quarterly

 

Vol. 54 , No. 2 - May 2016

 

 

Contents

 

Articles

 

PÉTER BOZÓ  
„Die Zauberflöte, eine Operette in zwey Aufzügen…”
Egy műfaji megjelölés 18. századi előtörténetéhez
117
’Die Zauberflöte, eine Operette in zwey Aufzügen’
On the 18th- Century Prehistory of a Genre Designation (Abstract)
131
MIHÁLY SZEGEDY- MASZÁK  
Richard Wagner alkotásainak nyoma Joyce műveiben 134
Traces of Richard Wagner’s Music in the Works of Joyce
(Abstract)
150
IMRE KOVÁCS  
Álom és szinesztézia
Megjegyzések a Lohengrin előjátékának befogadástörténetéhez
151
Dream and Synesthesia
Notes on the Reception History of the Prelude to Lohengrin (Abstract)
160
SETH MONAHAN  
„Megpróbáltalak megörökíteni…”
Mahler Hatodik szimfóniájának „Alma- témája” újragondolva – 1. rész
161
’I Have Tried to Capture you…’
Rethinking the ’Alma’ Theme from Mahler’s Sixth Symphony – First Part (Abstract)
188
JÜRGEN HUNKEMÖLLER  
Műfajok, témák, toposzok Bartók zenéjében
I. Sirató; II. Scherzo
189
(Abstract)  
ANNA DALOS  
A forma kérdései Kurtág György művészetében 214
The Problems of Form in György Kurtág’s Music (Abstract) 236

 

The whole issue (pdf)

 

 

 

ABSTRACTS

 

 

PÉTER BOZÓ

’Die Zauberflöte, eine Operette in zwey Aufzügen’
On the 18th- Century Prehistory of a Genre Designation

 

Since the nineteenth century, it has been claimed again and again that the term ‘operetta’ was coined by Mozart. This claim is surely false, and it is quite likely that this myth of origin goes back to an entry of the 1821 Dictionnaire de musique moderne by Henri de Castil- Blaze. Nevertheless, it is a fact, that the term  Operette was already in use during the eighteenth century, even if not entirely in the same sense as it has been used since the European dissemination of Jacques Offenbach’s works. In my study, I demonstrate for which works by Mozart the term was used in the composer’s correspondence, in the catalog of his juvenile works compiled by his father, as well as in contemporary printed librettos and musical sources.
On the other hand, I provide a brief overview of the definitions of the term ‘operetta’ to be found in eighteenth- century music lexicons, from Johann Gottfried Walther (1732) to Johann Christoph Koch (1802), and I try in this way to explain what Operette meant in the eighteenth century, even before Mozart’s birth.
Last but not least, I would like to show what the similarity is between Bastien und Bastienne, a teutsche Operetta by the child Mozart, and the early operettas by Offenbach, whose Théâtre des Bouffes- Parisiens performed Mozart’s Der Schauspieldirektor in 1856 for the first time in France, under the French title L’impresario, and a bit differently than how it was written by Mozart.

 

Péter Bozó is a music historian and research assistant in the Department of Hungarian Musical History at the MTA BTK Institute of Musicology. He obtained his PhD at the Budapest Music Academy in 2010 with a thesis devoted to Liszt’s songs based on a study of the sources at Weimar. As an OTKA and TÁMOP postdoctoral scholarship holder he has continued research work into operetta, its beginnings in Paris and its cultivation in Hungary. At the moment he holds a Bolyai scholarship. He coauthored and co- edited the volume Space, Time and Tradition published in 2013 by Rózsavölgyi, which is a selection from the theses written by doctoral students at the Liszt Academy.

 

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MIHÁLY SZEGEDY- MASZÁK

Traces of Richard Wagner’s Music in the Works of Joyce

 

Do the various arts bear comparison with one another? Not for the first time do I seek an answer to this question. This new consideration of it is justified by my conviction that an unequivocal answer cannot be found. This time I focus my attention on music and literature, with particular regard to the works of Joyce and Wagner. At the start of the twentieth century three cultivators of the English novel who temperamentally were very different from one another took as a point of departure the music of Richard Wagner: Virginia Woolf, D. H. Lawrence and James Joyce. Of the three authors it is the writings of Joyce which present the oeuvre of Wagner in the most all- round manner.


Mihály Szegedy- Maszák is Professor of Comparative Literature and Cultural Studies at Eötvös Loránd University, Professor Emeritus of Central Eurasian Studies at Indiana University, a member of Academia Europaea (London) and the Hungarian Academy of Sciences. He is the author of Literary Canons: National and International (2001), fourteen books in Hungarian (among them monographs on the authors Zsigmond Kemény, Sándor Márai, Géza Ottlik, and Dezsô Kosztolányi), editor- in- chief of a three- volume history of Hungarian literature (2007) and the journal Hungarian Studies, co- author of Théorie littéraire (1989), Epoche – Text – Modalität (1999), A Companion to Hungarian Studies (1999), Angezogen und abgestoßen: Juden in der ungarischen Literatur (1999), The Phoney Peace: Power and Culture in Central Europe 1945–49 (2000), National Heritage – National Canon (2001), and Der lange, dunkle Schatten: Studien zum Werk von Imre Kertész (2004). He has published articles on the culture of the Habsburg Monarchy, the theory of the novel, Romanticism, modernism, postmodernism, translation, and inter- art studies, Richard Wagner, Henry James, Gustav Mahler, Béla Bartók, Ezra Pound, Wilhelm Furtwängler, and Buster Keaton in English, French, German, Polish, Romanian, Chinese and Hungarian.

 

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IMRE KOVÁCS

Dream and Synesthesia
Notes on the Reception History of the Prelude to Lohengrin

 

The present study focuses on three textual interpretations – written by Wagner, Liszt, and Baudelaire – of the prelude to Lohengrin. All three are related in one way or another to dream, one of the key concepts of romanticism. Wagner speaks of submersion into infinite spaces, Liszt talks of a dream- like palace of wonders, and Baudelaire projects his thoughts onto the music based on the synesthetic vision of dreams. Baudelaire published the three essays in his well- known article, Richard Wagner and Tannhäuser (1861), which was fundamental in initiating the growth of the Wagner- cult in France. He compared his own interpretation with the earlier writings of Wagner and Liszt in the belief that all three essays were written in the same spirit. It is impossible not to notice that the intention of Baudelaire the poet and critic – who was not a professional in the field of music – was to legitimise his own interpretation. He wished to support his own ars poetica with the composers’ similar thoughts, they being his ideological fellows: Liszt, who believed in the transformability of the various forms of art, and Wagner, who centred his artistic credo around Gesamtkunstwerk. As the texts deal with the questions surrounding the formation, visualisation and reception of music, namely the basic artistic issues, we may detect the broader context of the ’period eye’ (and ear). Baudelaire was justified in thinking that these textual interpretations of the prelude to Lohengrin placed thus side by side would bring the recipient closer to the mysteries of this section of the composition that cannot be expressed accurately in words. We are faced here with a reception aesthetics fuelled by romanticism’s strong crticism of rationalism, at the centre of which we find the enigmatic category of the poetic which can be applied to both music and poetry. The main feature of this is a kind of incompleteness going beyond the limits of rationality, along with the resulting sense of loss which can be filled through the active participation of the recipient’s imagination.

 

Imre Kovács is an art historian. He works as an associate professor at the Department of Art History, Péter Pázmány Catholic University. He teaches courses in medieval, renaissance and 19th century art. He obtained his PhD in Art History at ELTE University, Budapest in 2001. Initially his research was focussed on medieval and renaissance iconography, and a recent addition to his field of interests is music and the visual arts in the 19th century. He was awarded 3- 6 month scholarships for research the different aspects of medieval and renaissance art from the Soros and the Andrew Mellon Foundation and also from the Hungarian State: Eötvös scholarship (Edinburgh University; Warburg Institute of London; Leuven, Catholic University). He also obtained a 3- year János Bolyai scholarship from the Hungarian Academy of Sciences to carry out research in the field of Liszt and the visual arts. The results of this have been published in Acta Historiae Artium, Studia Musicologica and Magyar Zene.

 

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SETH MONAHAN

’I Have Tried to Capture you…’
Rethinking the ’Alma’ Theme from Mahler’s Sixth Symphony – First Part

 

Since the 1940s, Mahler’s Sixth Symphony has been transmitted with an informal ‘domestic’ program centered on several claims first made in Alma Mahler’s Erinnerungen. In the work, she writes, Gustav meant to depict their children (in the Scherzo), himself (in the Finale), and finally her, in the first movement’s swooning secondary theme. Though critics have almost universally accepted Alma’s anecdote, few have seriously asked the important question of what such a portrait would be doing in Mahler’s most expressly tragic symphony. In this study I offer a hermeneutic perspective on the Sixth that concedes the possible truth of Alma’s anecdote but which challenges the conventional assumption that such a spousal tribute should best be understood as a one- sided testament to Mahler’s newfound nuptial bliss. After examining the theme’s reception history and Mahler’s domestic circumstances during the symphony’s composition, I explore the ways in which the first movement’s sonata narrative – a protracted conflict between (and reconciliation of) its two gendered subjects – suggestively mirrors the prevailing psychodynamics of Mahler’s strained marriage. At the end of the essay I propose how this revised hearing of the opening movement might prompt a reimagining of the entire Sixth as a projected or imagined ‘domestic tragedy’, with special focus on the intertextual links between the work’s outer movements and also between the cataclysmic finale and the penitentially anguished portions of the Third Symphony’s ‘Armer Kinder Betterlied’.


Seth Monahan is Associate Professor of Music Theory at the Eastman School of Music in Rochester, New York and the author of Mahler’s Symphonic Sonatas (OUP, 2015). His essays on musical form, meaning, and epistemology have appeared in Music Theory Spectrum, Music Analysis, the Journal of Music Theory, Music Theory Online, 19th- Century Music, the Journal of the American Musicological Society, Intégral, the Journal of Music Theory Pedagogy, and several multi- author volumes. His article ‘Action and Agency Revisited’ received the 2015 Society for Music Theory Emerging Scholar Award.

 

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JÜRGEN HUNKEMÖLLER

Gattungen, Sujets, Topoi Choral

 

The German original of this text appeared as part of the author's book entitled Bauernmusik und Klangmagie. Bartók- Studien (Hildesheim: Georg Olms Verlag, 2013), Klage (Chapter 4,
83–97.) and Scherzo (Chapter 7, 157–172.).

 

Jürgen Hunkemöller (born 1939) studied music pedagogy at the Hochschule Heidelberg, musicology, German language and literature, philosophy, and art history at the Universities of Köln and Heidelberg. Between 1966 and 1968 he lived in Paris for researchwork. He received his Ph. D. in Heidelberg in 1968. Between 1968 and 1973 he worked as Reinhold Hammerstein’s and Ewald Jammers’s assistent at the Heidelberg University. From 1969 until 2012 he was professor on music history at the Musikhochschule Mannheim (earlier Heidelberg), and also from 1973 to 2004 professor on musicology at he University of Education Schwäbisch Gmünd. He was guest professor and lecturer at the Universities of Heidelberg, Kiel, and Bern as well as at the Liszt Ferenc University of Music in Budapest. The center of his scholarly interest are music history of the 18- 20th centuries, jazz and its reception, and music and religion.

 

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ANNA DALOS 

The Problems of Form in György Kurtág’s Music

 

Kurtág-research characterizes musical form as a questionable feature of György Kurtág’s oeuvre. As experts put it, while small forms remain natural manifestations of the composer’s music, expansive forms are alien to his musical world. Kurtág’s longer pieces are constructed in succession of rather shorter movements. My paper aims to demonstrate Kurtág’s understanding of form, especially of the tiniest formal
element, the period (built on the antipode of question and answer), which is the very starting point for Kurtág’s interpretation of musical form. My study investigates the composer’s instrumental works – his piano tutor, Games (Játékok, from the 1970s till now), other shorter chamber works, and his Double Concerto, Op. 27 No. 2 (1989–1990) – to shed new light on the interpretation of Kurtág’s music.

 

Anna Dalos studied musicology at the Franz Liszt Academy of Music, Budapest (1993–1998), and attended the Doctoral Programme in Musicology at the same institution (1998–2002). She spent a year on a German exchange scholarship (DAAD) at the Humboldt University, Berlin (1999–2000). As a winner of the ’Lendület’ grant of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences she is head of the Archives and Research Group for 20th–21st Century Hungarian Music at the Institute of Musicology RCH HAS. Her research is focused on 20th century music and the history of composition and musicology in Hungary. She has published several short monographs on Hungarian composers (György Kósa, Rudolf Maros, Pál Kadosa), as well as articles in different languages on these subjects. Her book on Zoltán Kodály’s poetics was published in 2007, and a collection of her essays on Kodály (Kodály and history) recently, in 2015.

 

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