Magyar Zene Music Quarterly

 

 

 

 

Magyar Zene

Hungarian Language Music Quarterly

 

Vol. 54 , No. 1 - February 2016

 

 

Contents

 

Articles

 

PÁL RICHTER  
Az élő barokk
Az Apponyi (Zaj- ugróczi) kézirat (1730) repertoárjának népzenei vonatkozásai
5
The Living Baroque (Abstract) 17
VERONIKA KUSZ  
Európai házimuzsika Florida szívében
Dohnányi és Zathureczky privát hangfelvételeiről
18
European Domestic Music- Making in the Heart of Florida
The Private Recordings of Dohnányi and Zathureczky (Abstract)
30
LÁSZLÓ STACHÓ  
Érzékiség és szigor
Az előadóművész Bartók
31
Rigour and Sensuality
Bartók’s Ideals of Piano Performance (Abstract)
59
CSILLA MÁRIA PINTÉR  
Modern magyar ritmustan, 1911–1927
Molnár Antal: A zenei ritmus alapfogalmai
60
A Modern Hungarian Theory of Rhythm, 1911–1927
Antal Molnár: A zenei ritmus alapfogalmai (Abstract)
68
PÉTER LAKI  
Inferno és paradiso Tamás János (1936–95) oratóriumaiban 69
Inferno and Paradiso in the Oratorios of János Tamás (1936–95)
(Abstract)
79

Short Contributions

 

VERONIKA JUHÁSZ  
“…hazánk fiatal nemzedékétől várhatjuk csak a magyar zene kimivelését…’
Hogyan támogatta Mosonyi Mihály a magyar zene ügyét
80
„…it is from Hungary’s Younger Generation that the Development of Hungarian music is to be Expected…”
(Abstract)
84
DÁNIEL MONA  
A zeneszerző kritikus
Mosonyi Mihály Zenészeti Lapokban megjelent kritikáiról
85
The Composer as Critic
Musical Criticism by Mihály Mosonyi Published in the Zenészeti Lapok
(Abstract)
92

Reviews

 

ZOLTÁN FARKAS  
Harminckét változat egy classicus témára
Berlász Melinda–Grabócz Márta (szerk.): Tanulmánykötet Ujfalussy József
emlékére. Budapest: L’Harmattan Kiadó, 2013
93
MELINDA BERLÁSZ  
„Élő láncszem a zenetörténethez”
Kusz Veronika: Dohnányi amerikai évei. Budapest: Rózsavölgyi, 2014
101
DÁNIEL NAGY  
Új időknek új dalai?
Grabócz Márta: Entre naturalisme sonore et synthèse en temps réel. Images et
formes expressives dans la musique contemporaine. Paris: Éditions des archives,
2013
107

 

The whole issue (pdf)

 

 

 

ABSTRACTS

 

 

PÁL RICHTER

The Living Baroque

 

Already in 1933, Zoltán Kodály directed researchers’attention to the close connection between folk music and the history of music: ‘Musical ethnography is a precondition, even as the most important auxiliary science, of Hungarian historical work on music. Only ethnographical experience and ethnographical knowledge give the necessary warmth for infusing life into the historical data of music.’ Thus musical folklore can revive, explain and interpret written historical data of music. To illustrate the close relationship between folk melodies and historical ones, I have compared notated instrumental music examples taken from the so- called Apponyi manuscript, one of the historical sources of the 18th century (1730), with folk music pieces, and melodies collected in the 20th century, usually dating back to an 18th century or earlier tradition.

 

Pál Richter was born in Budapest, graduated from the Liszt Ferenc University of Music as a musicologist in 1995, and obtained a PhD degree in 2004. His special field of research is 17th century music of Hungary, and conducted his PhD research in the same subject. Other main fields of his interest are Hungarian folk music, classical and 19th century music theory and multimedia in music education. Since 1990 he has been involved in the computerized cataloguing of the folk music collection of the Institute for Musicology of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences and has participated in ethnographic field research, too. From 2005 he was the head of Folk Music Archives, and recently has become the director of the Institute of Musicology, Research Centre for the Humanities HAS. He regularly delivers papers at conferences abroad, publishes articles and studies and teaches music theory and the study of musical forms at the Liszt Ferenc University of Music in Budapest. Since 2007 he has been directing the new folk music training, and is the head of the Folk Music Department.

 

Back to top »

 

 

 

VERONIKA KUSZ 

„…it is from Hungary’s Younger Generation that the Development of Hungarian music is to be Expected…”

The Private Recordings of Dohnányi and Zathureczky

 

Ernst von Dohnányi could not end his exceptional career in a less deserving place than the small capital city of Florida State where he lived his last ten years (1949–1960). Tallahassee was very far from being a cultural place, it had neither a theatre nor any professional concert life in the 1950s. As the conductor- pianist Ernô Dániel, Dohnányi’s former pupil wrote in a letter from a very similar Texas town: a Hungarian emigrant musician would have missed very much the ‘musical atmosphere’ and the solid ‘musical background’ of Budapest. Dániel was probably referring not only to the professional musical life as a ‘background’ but to a more basic musical experiment: the culture of domestic music- making and the rich salon- life of turn- of- the century Budapest. For Dohnányi, this kind of musical culture meant a lot, indeed, as he grew up in Pozsony [Bratislava] a city of flourishing bourgeois musical life. So it is not surprising that shortly after his arrival, he started to launch a similar salon- like culture in Tallahassee, too. With the active support of his wife, he organized musical gatherings in his own home with such illustrious guests as Frances Magnes, Albert Spalding, Christoph von Dohnányi, Antal Doráti and Ede Zathureczky. With the cooperation of the latter artist, even some amateur sound recordings of their private performances remain in the American legacy – recordings that now belong to the Dohnányi Collection of the Institute for Musicology of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences. Dohnányi and Zathureczky played a dozen duo- sonatas, among them works by Mozart, Beethoven, Schumann, Franck and Dohnányi. This paper attempts to give a short overview of the Dohnányis’ Tallahassee ‘salon’, to summarize the history of the relationship of Dohnányi and Zathureczky, and to describe their late sonata recordings as very valuable sources of their spontaneous musicality.

 

Veronika Kusz (b. 1980) is a research fellow of the Institute for Musicology of the Research Center for the Humanities of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences. She studied musicology at the Liszt Academy of Music, and obtained her PhD at the same institute in 2010. She was a Fulbright grantee in 2005–2006 working in Dohnányi’s American legacy. Her monograph on Dohnányi’s late years was published in 2015.

 

Back to top »

 

 

 

LÁSZLÓ STACHÓ 

Rigour and Sensuality
Bartók’s Ideals of Piano Performance

 

This study on Béla Bartók’s ideals of piano performance is a chapter from the third part of my dissertation on Bartók the pianist. Here I approach his ‘objective’ and ‘anti- sentimental’ stance regarding performance (to quote some of the most used adjectives about his playing) through the typical interpretative patterns of
the following musical elements: the so- called ‘metrical fillers’, the melodic peaks and centre- points, and the cadences. In the four subsections of my paper I compare Bartók’s typical interpretations of these musical elements in Beethoven’s music, through detailed analyses of his score editions published between 1909 and 1912, with Hans von Bülow’s, Eugen d’Albert’s, and Artur Schnabel’s respective interpretations. With these analyses I hope to convincingly reveal the presumable ideal forms of Bartók’s interpretations of piano works of the past (alongside with those of his notable contemporaries and predecessors) with an almost microscopic precision, as well as the cognitive, generative rules at work in his interpretative choices. Moreover, an additional analysis of a Mozart sonata edition (K. 545) sheds light on an intriguing phenomenon. Through this representative example I demonstrate how Bartók’s interpretation can be considered puritanical and anti- sentimental with respect to that of Kálmán Chován, Bartók’s senior colleague at the Royal Academy of Music: in the latter’s interpretation the representation of the metrical and grouping structures is obscured by an obsessive focus on local tonal and melodic elements.

 

László Stachó is a musicologist, psychologist and musician working as a senior lecturer at the Liszt Academy of Music (Budapest) and at the Faculty of Music of the University of Szeged. His academic activity involves the teaching of chamber music, music theory and twentieth- century performing practice history, as well as recently introduced subjects in Hungary, such as the psychology of musical performance and Practice Methodology. His research focuses on Bartók analysis, twentieth- century performing practice (especially the performing style of the composer–pianists Bartók and Dohnányi), emotional communication in musical performance, and music pedagogy (effective and creative working and practice methods and enhancement of attentional skills in music performance). As a pianist, he regularly performs chamber music and conducts Practice Methodology workshops and chamber music coaching sessions at masterclasses. In 2014, he was a CMPCP Visiting Fellow at the University of Cambridge.

 

Back to top »

 

 

 

CSILLA MÁRIA PINTÉR

A Modern Hungarian Theory of Rhythm, 1911–1927
Antal Molnár: A zenei ritmus alapfogalmai

 

Antal Molnár was one of the most significant personalities of twentieth century Hungarian musical life. He is considered to be one of the fathers of modern Hungarian musicology. Between 1907 and 1910 he completed the composition class at the Music Academy under the direction of Viktor Herzfeld. His career as
an instrumentalist began in 1910. For three years he played the viola in the Waldbauer-Kerpely String Quartet. From 1910 onwards he published articles on music in the famous Hungarian literary journal, Nyugat. His interest in new music was realised in articles on the music of his contemporaries, particularly Bartók and Kodály. He taught both theoretical and practical subjects, music history, music aesthetics and music theory at the Music Academy. He wrote some of his books to provide a background for his teaching. One of these works is his treatise on rhythm, A zenei ritmus alapfogalmai [The Elements of Musical Rhythm], which was written in 1911, and published in 1927. The significance of this book consists in its being the first comprehensive study on musical rhythm in Hungary. The subject of this article is a survey of Antal Molnár’s views on musical rhtyhm and, in conncection with this, the principles of the Hungarian musical avant- guard in that field emphasizing the exeptional role of rhythm in Bartók’s and Kodály’s
compositional thinking.

 

Csilla Mária Pintér studied musicology at the Liszt Academy of Music in Budapest. In 2011 she obtained her PhD with a dissertation on Emblematic Stylistic Marks in Bartók’s Rhythm. She has been on the staff of the Bartók Archives since 2000.

 

Back to top »

 

 

 

PÉTER LAKI 

Inferno and Paradiso in the Oratorios of János Tamás (1936–95)

 

János Tamás, born in Budapest, emigrated to Switzerland in 1956 and developed an active career there as composer, conductor, pianist and teacher. He composed more than 120 works in all genres: orchestral, vocal, chamber. His entire compositional Nachlass is currently preserved at the Paul Sacher Archives in Basel. Tamás’s catalog includes three large- scale oratorios on religious themes, which not only illustrate the evolution of his style but also transmit his personal philosophy about good and evil, and give evidence of an existential struggle for genuine moral values. The first oratorio, Das infernalische Abendmahl (1972), is based on an expressionist poem by Georg Heym; the second, Noahs Tochter (1986), is a setting of a libretto written for Tamás by Swiss writer Claudia Storz. The third, Die Stimmen der Erde (1993), is an adaptation of writings by the Lebanese Christian author Mikhail Naimy. In each work, the argument proceeds through a series of inversions where a traditional event or idea is interpreted in an utterly non- traditional way. The Last Supper is turned into a horrific vision of suffering; Noah is given a daughter who refuses to enter the Ark and questions the whole idea of salvation; and the evil actions of humankind constantly threaten to destroy God’s creation. Yet in each case, negativity is overcome: the damned souls in Hell fall asleep and enjoy a respite from their pain; the necessity of the ‘new path’ humanity has to take outweighs the objections of Noah’s daughter; and a vision of boundless love triumphs over all adversity in the last oratorio. Das infernalische Abendmahl, which remains unperformed to this day, is an experimental score with graphic notation and many avantgardistic effects. In the last two oratorios, Tamás returned to a more traditional way of writing, yet he always speaks in a very personal voice that deserves to be heard.

 

Péter Laki (b. 1954) graduated from the Franz Liszt Academy (now University) of Music in 1979 and received his Ph. D. from the University of Pennsylvania in 1989. He served as Program Annotator of the Cleveland Orchestra from 1990 to 2002 and taught courses at Case Western Reserve University, Kent State University, John Carroll University and Oberlin College between 1990 and 2007. Since 2007, he has been on the faculty of Bard College in Annandale- on- Hudson, New York. Laki is the author of numerous musicological articles and the editor of Bartók and His World, a collection of essays and documents published by Princeton University Press in 1995.

 

Back to top »

 

 

 

VERONIKA JUHÁSZ

„…it is from Hungary’s Younger Generation that the Development of Hungarian music is to be Expected…”
 

Mihály Mosonyi’s music criticism in the Zenészeti Lapok (Musical Pages) was an important part of his main goal: to create a distinctively Hungarian musical style. Besides writing about outstanding figures of the time’s musical life, his pedagogical strategy was to support those composers who seemed to be talented but less skilled. With his benevolent criticism he wanted them to improve and become the foundation of a Hungarian musical style. In addition to secular music he was also concerned about church music, regardless its being Catholic, Presbyterian or Lutheran. In this paper I have selected some good examples from Mosonyi’s diverse activities in the Zenészeti Lapok to illustrate how they served the cause of Hungarian music.

 

Veronika Juhász is a librarian at the Research Library for Music History at the Liszt Academy of Music, Budapest. She received her Master’s degree in Library and Information Science from Eötvös Loránd University in 2013, and also a BA degree in Liberal Arts with specialization in art history at the same institute in 2010.

 

Back to top »

 

 

 

DÁNIEL MONA

The Composer as Critic
Musical Criticism by Mihály Mosonyi Published in the Zenészeti Lapok

 

Mihály Mosonyi (1815–1870) as a composer, a musical journalist and a musical pedagogue had only one aim: to raise the culture of the Hungarian music- loving public to a European level, and to advance the composition of Hungarian music. He was a supporter of the musical institutions then in operation and the movement for new Hungarian music. In 1842 he moved to Pest, from which time he was occupied with establishing an independent Hungarian musical journal, a project realized when on October 3rd 1860 there appeared the first issue of Zenészeti Lapok. The editor was Kornél Ábrányi and Mosonyi was one of the chief contributors. He wrote many different columns and on occasion also the editorial. In addition he wrote concert reviews, criticisms of new compositions and some open letters. He often analysed and improved works by second and third rank amateur composers, and at other times the journal published folk song arrangements by him or even his lessons in harmony. Up until his departure in March 1866 around two hundred articles by him appeared in Zenészeti Lapok, often in serialized form. Regardless of whether it was a column or the subject of an article he was writing, his desire was to further the cause of Hungarian music.

 

Dániel Mona is a final year student at the Ferenc Liszt Music Academy in Budapest. He obtained his BA in 2014 and is at present finishing his MA. He works as a musical journalist, and also since the spring of 2014 as a research assistant at the Liszt Ferenc Memorial Museum and Research Centre.

 

 

Back to top »