Magyar Zene Music Quarterly

 

 

 

 

Magyar Zene

Hungarian Language Music Quarterly

 

Vol. 52 , No. 2 - May 2014

 

 

Contents

 

Articles

 

JÁNOS BOJTI  
A szenvedés mint alapvető népi életérzés Muszorgszkij művészetében 125
Suffering as Basic to Folk Emotional Life in the Music of Mussorgsky
(Abstract)
136
VIRÁG BÜKY  
Dittáé – az éjszaka zenéi 137
To Ditta – The Nights Musics
(Abstract)
158
LÓRÁNT PÉTERI  
Az új zenéről szóló közbeszéd és a zenepolitika összefüggései az 1960- as évek első felének Magyarországán
Mihály András 3. szimfóniájának fogadtatása
159
The Reception of András Mihály’s Third Symphony (1962):

Discourse on New Music and Cultural Politics
(Abstract)

174

Work in Progress

 

PÉTER TORNYAI  
Egy antiklasszikus klasszikus
Alla danza tedesca
175
An Anti- Classical Classic
Alla danza tedesca
(Abstract)
203
IMOLA V. SZŰCS  
„Ének őrzi az időt”
Újra a Bartók- egyneműkarok szövegforrásainak nyomában
205
„Singing Preserves Time”
Once More on the Trail of the Textual Sources of Bartók’s Choruses for Male or Female Voices
223

Review

 

KATALIN KOMLÓS  
Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach: „Kenner und Liebhaber” Collections I–II 224
PÁL RICHTER  
„Csupa kérdés és talány”
A Deák–Szentes kézirat
228
 

 

The whole issue (pdf)

 

 

 

ABSTRACTS

 

 

JÁNOS BOJTI

Suffering as Basic to Folk Emotional Life in the Music of Mussorgsky

 

Why does one of the young heroes in Mussorgsky’s song cycle The Nursery tell the story of an imaginary island where „there’s no sowing and no harvesting”? What does the hard work of the peasants, their suffering, their sorrows and consolation, have to do with a child’s dream? This study, which forms part of a
book on Khovanshchina, points to a so far unrevealed connection between three songs – Cradle Song (1865) composed to words by Ostrovsky, the fourth song of The Nursery (1870) and Trepak from the cycle Songs and Dances of Death (1875) – and the opening of act 4 scene 2 (1879?) of Khovanshchina in which the peasants near Moscow watch with sorrow and sympathy the departure of Prince Golitsin as he is led into exile. The duality of suffering and consolation appear in all three songs using the same dramaturgy amd musical techniques, and these, enriched with new significance, are built into Khovanshchina, transformed into music for chorus and orchestra.

 

János Bojti (b.1943) obtained a cello teacher’s diploma in 1966 at the Béla Bartók Music School and a choral conductor’s diploma in 1971 at the Liszt Academy. In 1972 he worked as a musical assistant at Hungarian Radio, from 1973–1993 at Hungaroton records, and until his retirement in 2013, in the record library of the Liszt Academy. He is the musical producer on many recordings. He has published a book and many articles on Russian music, and has completed an orchestration of Khovanshchina together with a reconstruction of the missing parts of the score.

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VIRÁG BÜKY

To Ditta – The Night’s Musics

 

During the 23 years of their marriage, Bartók dedicated several compositions to his second wife, the pianist Ditta Pásztory. Among these works, there were remarkable, large scale masterpieces like the Sonata for piano, or the 3rd Piano Concerto and also some lesser works like the Lánycsúfoló (Mocking of Girls). However, none of them is in such an intimate relationship with the dedicatee (Ditta Pásztory), as Az éjszaka zenéje (The Night’s Music), the fourth number of the Szabadban (Out of Doors) series, composed in 1926. The aim of the present study was to find explanation for this particular connection. Due to the fact that The Night’s Music of 1926 was regarded as the first realisation of a specific Bartókian genre generally referred to as „night music” by Bartók scholars, we included in our investigation all those movements which might be regarded as representative of this genre. However, to have a better understanding of the connections between the different realisations of the „night music” genre, we focused our attention not only on the works described as „night music” but also on those earlier compositions by Bartók, in which some characteristic traits of the later „night music” are already detectable.

Examining these compositions we discovered some characteristics which might be described as feminine, as for instance their relationship with the dirges, a genre and even an action closely related to women, or some more elusive traits, like their introspective mood, or their more colourful texture in comparison with
other works by Bartók.

 

Virág Büky graduated in musicology from the Ferenc Liszt Academy of Music in Budapest in 2002 with the thesis A vokális moresca. Egy népszerű műfaj a 16. század végi Itáliában. [The moresca vocale: A popular genre in late 16th century Italy]. In 2001–2004 she was a postgraduate at the Budapest Academy. At present she is a research assistant, working on her PhD dissertation on Bartók and the exoticism of the turn of the 20th century. Since 2000 she has been working at the Bartók Archives of the Institute for Musicology of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences.

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LÓRÁNT PÉTERI

The Reception of András Mihály’s Third Symphony (1962):

Discourse on New Music and Cultural Politics

 

Based on archival and press sources, this case study examines the discourse on new music in Hungary in the early 1960s, with special regard to its cultural, political and dominant ideological environment. Focussing on the reception of the 1962 première of the Third Symphony by András Mihály (1917–1993), I wish to present how musical modernism was perceived under the circumstances of the changing cultural politics of the post- Stalinist period of Hungarian state socialism. Although the leading ideologues of the musical field had already distanced themselves from Zhdanovism, they still regarded socialist realism as the most preferable existing movement and/or as the teleological destination of Hungarian music. Mihály’s Third Symphony cannot be counted as a representative of the most experimental style in 1960s’ Hungary, not to mention the global scene. The majority of the reviews of the work still focussed on the question of the modern ‘language’ of the Symphony. The six reviews, however, also document the pluralist nature of musical criticism at that time in the Hungarian capital, with its population of one and a half million.
The Third Symphony was also discussed at the general meeting of the Hungarian Musicians’ Association, which followed a week after the première. Mihály, who had been active in the communist takeover of musical life between 1948 and 1950, now publicly broke with the teleological view of contemporary music, and emphasized the value of stylistic diversity. He also rejected the principle that cultural policy- makers had to support one chosen musical style instead of others, in the name of the increasingly unfathomable concept of socialist realism.

 

Lóránt Péteri, musicologist and music critic, is Reader and Member of the Doctoral Council at the Liszt Academy of Music, Budapest. He graduated from the same institution in 2002 and also from Eötvös Loránd University, where he studied history, in 2006. As a postgraduate research student, he received supervision from the University of Oxford in 2004/05 and received his Ph.D. from the University of Bristol, UK, in 2008 with a dissertation entitled ’The Scherzo of Mahler’s Second Symphony: A Study of Genre’. Among his contributions are the studies „God and Revolution – Rewriting the Absolute: Bence Szabolcsi and the Discourse of Hungarian Musical Life”. In: Blazekovic Z. and Dobbs Mackenzie B. (eds.): Music’s Intellectual History. New York: RILM, 2009); and „Form, Meaning and Genre in the Scherzo of Mahler’s Second Symphony”. Studia Musicologica 50 / 3- 4, 2009.

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PÉTER TORNYAI

An Anti- Classical Classic

Alla danza tedesca

 

The Alla danza tedesca movement of the String Quartet Op. 130 in B flat major is at first sight one of the shortest and simplest closed (rounded) forms in the late Beethoven quartets. In more general surveys generally it is (only) the coda that receives a mention: the place where the bars of the theme – with serial symmetry – are played in reverse order. With a thorough- going analysis of the Alla danza tedesca I have attempted to unpick how this little game derives from the compositional logic that determines the whole movement. This analysis demonstrates in perhaps its most clear example how far the composer of the late Beethoven quartets departed from „classical” formal thinking, and the connection of this to phenonema like the rejection of traditional tonal and harmonic patterns, and the emancipation of music’s dynamic stratum. As a practising quartet player I thought it important to draw the conclusions from the results of my analysis which apply to performance; I did this by comparing recordings by eleven important string quartet ensembles.
 

Péter Tornyai (b.1987) graduated in composition and violin playing from the Liszt Academy in 2012. Since 2013 he has studied at the Doctoral School. He spent half a year in Rome on a scholarship. He has been awarded prizes in several composers’ competions in Hungary and internationally. As a chamber music player he is an active participant in Hungarian musical life, along with the premieres of his compositions.

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IMOLA V. SZŰCS

„Singing Preserves Time”
Once More on the Trail of the Textual Sources of Bartók’s Choruses for Male or Female Voices

 

The preliminary step to this study was László Somfai’s monograph published in 1969 in which he identifies the textual sources of all except six of Béla Bartók’s choruses for male or female voices. Among these the first and last items of the three movements of his cycle From Olden Times for men’s voices differ from the rest in their source of text: whereas in all the others the composer turned to folk poetry, in these two items he deliberately chose words from composed songs. In the first part of the present study I examine the historical and literary background of these two choruses, together with their relationship to folk poetry and literary poetry. In the second part I search for the textual sources of the missing six choruses mentioned above from the 27 Choruses; of these I have managed to identify five (Pillow Dance, Suitor, Jeering, I have a ring, Girls’ Teasing Song).


Imola V. Szűcs began her musical studies as a singer. She gained her first diploma in the church cantor department of the Baptist Theological Academy, and along with this studied solfège, music theory and choral conducting at the Music College in Miskolc. Her graduation dissertation was on the mutual influences of folksong and folk singing. As an MA student in the Musicology department of the Liszt Academy she wrote her dissertation on the operatic performance history of Bluebeard’s Castle.
Her chief spheres of interest are the history of opera, the influence of folk singing on folksong and the use of folk sources in later examples of composed music. At present she is working on the preparation of scores for the complete Erkel edition and teaches music history at the Leo Weiner Music College.

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