Magyar Zene Music Quarterly

 

 

 

 

Magyar Zene

Hungarian Language Music Quarterly

 

Vol. 51 , No. 3 - August 2013

 

 

Contents

 

Articles

 

BALÁZS MIKUSI  
Haydn Il Distratto kísérőzenéje és a „színházi szimfónia” esztétikája 249
Haydn’s Il Distratto and the Aesthetics of the Theatre Symphony (Abstract) 281
KLÁRA HAMBURGER  
Ismeretlen Liszt- dokumentumok német könyvtárakban 282
Unpublished Liszt Documents in German Libraries (Abstract) 296
PÉTER BOZÓ  
Az egyházzenész operettje
Sztojanovits Jenő: Peking rózsája
297
The Church Musician’s Operetta
Jenő Sztojanovits: The Rose of Peking (Abstract)
315

Short Contribution

 

BALÁZS SZABÓ  
Bartók 1. hegedű- zongoraszonátájának fináléjáról 316
The Finale of Bartók’s First Violin Sonata (Abstract) 322

Work in Progress

 

VIOLA BIRÓ  
Megjegyzések Lajtha László szerenádzenéjéhez 323
Observations on László Lajtha’s Serenade Music (Abstract) 334
FERENC JÁNOS SZABÓ  
Lajtha László fiatalkori zongoraművei 335
The Early Piano Works of László Lajtha (Abstract) 350

 

The whole issue (pdf)

 

 

 

ABSTRACTS

 

 

BALÁZS MIKUSI

Haydn’s Il Distratto and the Aesthetics of the Theatre Symphony

 

The first half of this article presents an intriguing discovery: the C- major closing section of the fourth movement of Haydn’s Symphony No. 60 is based on a popular vaudeville „Quand un tendron viant dans ces lieux.” On the basis of the texts attached to this tune I propose a new interpretation of the narrative of this movement, suggesting that the original vaudeville was likely sung on stage during the production of Jean- François Regnard’s Le distrait for which Haydn’s music was written. Besides shedding light on this single movement, however, the discovery also draws attention to a general aesthetic controversy. Whereas modern commentators have typically related the irregular features of Haydn’s music to the stage action of Regnard’s play, all the contemporary evidence suggests that Haydn’s audience expected the composer to portray the title- giving absentmindedness of the main character. To resolve this conflict, I argue that the work should better be understood in the context of „characteristic symphonies,” and propose
that any conclusions drawn from the analyses of Il Distratto regarding Haydn’s other „theatre symphonies” should be viewed with extreme caution.

 

Balázs Mikusi holds a PhD from Cornell University (Ithaca, NY), and has been head of the Music Department at the National Széchényi Library, Budapest, since 2009. Previously he studied musicology at the Liszt Academy (now University) of Music, and held Fulbright and DAAD fellowships, among others. His scholarly interests are wide- ranging, but the music of Joseph Haydn plays a special role: he has published on this topic in Eighteenth Century Music, Journal of Musicological Research, Ad Parnassum, Studia Musicologica, and further articles are forthcoming in Haydn- Studien, Eisenstädter Haydn- Berichte, HAYDN: The Online Journal of the Haydn Society of North America, as well as a new collection of essays entitled The Land of Opportunity: Joseph Haydn and Britain. His monograph on The Secular Partsong in Germany 1780–1815 is also forthcoming in the Eastman Studies in Music series of the University of Rochester Press.

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KLÁRA HAMBURGER

Unpublished Liszt Documents in German Libraries

 

a) 57 autograph letters + 5 papers (programme- drafts etc) in the Music Department of the Staatsbibliothek zu Berlin, written between 1839 and 1886; 33 in French, 19 in German. Letters to his publishers (16 to Hermann Haertel), composers (Felix Mendelssohn- Bartholdy, Richard Wagner, Theodor Kullak, Heinrich Dorn, Robert Volkmann, etc.), to musicians (Ludwig Rellstab, Leopold Zellner, Carl Weitzmann, Johann Herbeck, Mme Érard etc.) On his compositions (to Haertel): original works: Consolations, LW 172, Études d’exécution transcendante, LW 139; transcriptions of Beethoven’s works: Symphonies No. 4.,5.,6.,7, LW 464, An die ferne Geliebte LW 469; of J. S. Bach’s works: Sechs Pedalfugen, LW 462; paraphrases on Meyerbeer’s Le Prophète, LW 414, LW 259.

 

b) 16 unpublished documents in the Stadt- und Universitaetsbibliothek Frankfurt. 1 letter from Liszt’s mother Anna Maria Liszt, 10 documents in French, 5 in German. 11 letters. An acknowledgement of receipt of 200 frcs, for a concert by the young Liszt, from the Duchess of Berry, 04.03.1824, Paris, signed „Liszts”, probably by Ferdinando Paër.

 

Klára Hamburger, born in Budapest, studied musicology at the Franz Liszt Music Academy Budapest, degree 1961. „Doctor of Sciences”, of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences (2003), member of the Committee for Musicology. Worked as a librarian, an editor of music books (publishing house „Gondolat”, Budapest 1966-199O), Secretary General of the Hungarian Liszt Society (1991- 2005). Books: Liszt, a biography, in Hungarian [Budapest: Gondolat, 1966, 1980], in German: Franz Liszt [Budapest: Corvina Press, 1973, 1987] and in English [Budapest: Corvina Press, 1987]. Franz Liszt Leben und Werk. [Weimar – Köln – Wien: Böhlau Verlag, 2010.] A Concert Goer’s Liszt- Handbook, in Hungarian [Liszt kalauz, Editio Musica Budapest, 1986]; Liszt Ferenc zenéje (The Music of F. Liszt). Budapest: Balassi Kiadó, 2010; Franz Liszt. Lettres à Cosima et à Daniela [Mardaga, Sprimont, 1996]); Franz Liszt. Briefwechsel mit seiner Mutter. [Eisenstadt, 2000]. Studies in Hungarian, American, English, French, Dutch, Swedish, Russian periodicals and series. Editor of Franz Liszt. Beiträge von ungarischen Autoren [Budapest: Corvina, 1978]; Liszt 2000 [Budapest: Hungarian Liszt Society, 2000]. Papers at different international conferences in Hungarian, German, English, French, Italian. Award for Excellence of the American Liszt Society, 1994. Szabolcsi Prize, 2007.

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PÉTER BOZÓ

Az egyházzenész operettje
Sztojanovits Jenő: Peking rózsája

 

In my study I deal with the musico- theatrical context of a failed operetta, premiered on 7 April 1888 at the Budapest Folk Theatre. Its composer, Jenő Sztojanovits (1864–1919), was a distinguished church musician, critic and music teacher of his time. He is, however, little- known today and is often confused with his contemporary, Petar Stojanovic´, a Serbian composer likewise born in Budapest. The exotic piece in question bears the title Peking rózsája (The Rose of Peking); it was given only thirteen times and its sources have never been studied since then, despite the fact that they survive almost intact in the Budapest Széchényi National Library. The libretto, written by a certain Miksa Rothauser, is based on a well- known story: Gozzi’s tragi- comic fiaba teatrale, Turandot. Of course, this is a highly unorthodox and less bloodthirsty version of the subject than Gozzi’s piece or Puccini’s later opera.
In the contemporary repertory of the Folk Theatre we often find historical operettas whose plot takes place in the glorious past of the Hungarian nation (following Lecocq’s example whose historical opéra- comiques were regularly performed in the 1870s and 1880s). The most successful early Hungarian operettas were adaptations of French vaudeville comedies set to music by a Polish- born ’Hungarian’ composer, József (in fact: Józef) Konti. But why create an exotic Chinese operetta in a country that had no colonies at all and had no connections with the Far East? I show what kind of musical devices Sztojanovits used to depict Chinese local colour. I argue that in his composition he imitated the style of Gilbert and Sullivan’s Japanese operetta, The Mikado, whose Hungarian premiere took place at the Folk Theatre two years before that of Peking rózsája.

 

Péter Bozó (1980 Budapest). From 1998 to 2003 he studied musicology at the Liszt Academy of Music in Budapest. He received his PhD at the same university in 2010 with a dissertation dedicated to Liszt’s song output. Between 1999 and 2007 he worked as a contributor at the Budapest Liszt Memorial Museum and Research Centre. Since 2006 he has been an assistant research fellow, and since October 2010 a research fellow at the Institute for Musicology of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences. Between 2006 and 2009 he was assistant editor of the international journal Studia Musicologica. At present he is studying the history of operetta in Hungary. He has lectured at the First Stuttgart International Liszt Conference; at the International Musicological Workshop of the ESF ’Music, Culture and Politics in Early Nineteenth- Century Europe, 1815–1848’; and at the Viennese International Conference “Die Operette und das Tragische”.

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BALÁZS SZABÓ

The Finale of Bartók’s First Violin Sonata

 

There are important studies in the Bartók literature that deal with the form and content of the finale of Bartók’s First Violin Sonata. Our picture of the work has been enriched by many important points following from analyses based on rondo form and sonata- rondo form (Kárpáti, Kroó, Laki, Seiber, Tallián, Griffiths, Stevens, Wilson) as well as from those exploring the complex structures that arise from a comparison with other works of the composer – above all the Third String Quartet (Somfai, Kárpáti), together with analyses that focus on the folk music roots of the thematic material (Somfai, Ujfalussy). Following in these footsteps this paper examines the finale in relation to other violin works composed by Bartók up until the middle of the 1930s, and offers a few observations in contribution towards a deeper understanding of the piece.

 

Balázs Szabó (*1970, Székesfehérvár, Hungary). He studied violin with Csaba Pothof in Győr between 1989–1993. Since 1993 he has been a music teacher at the László Hermann Music School and Music Secondary School in Székesfehérvár. Between 1995–2003 he studied musicology at the Ferenc Liszt University of Music in Budapest. Since 2002 he has been teaching at the Széchenyi University in Győr.

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VIOLA BIRÓ

Observations on László Lajtha’s Serenade Music

 

Hungarian serenades composed in the first half of the 20th century were modelled primarily on Zoltán Kodály’s Serenade for two violins and viola (1919–1920). László Lajtha, a colleague ten years younger than Kodály, following his own compositional style unique among contemporary Hungarian composers, created an intonation peculiar to his serenades. A considerable number of his chamber music compositions are related to the serenade genre, sometimes with a clear reference to it in their titles (String trio no. 1, op. 9, „Sérénade”, Three nocturnes, op. 34, String trio no. 3, op. 41, „Transylvanian Evenings”). The present paper gives a short outline of the history of the genre in the 20th century, focusing on Lajtha’s works, giving special attention to one of his most balanced compositions in his serenade music. Transylvanian evenings (1945) – contradicting the context in which it was composed – creates an idealized musical representation of a country newly lost to Hungary.

 

Viola Biró (1985) studied musicology at the Gheorghe Dima Academy of Music in Cluj- Napoca (Kolozsvár), Romania (2004–2008), and at the Liszt Ferenc Academy of Music in Budapest (2008–2010). Since 2010 she has attended doctoral studies in musicology at the same institution. She is writing her dissertation on Béla Bartók’s research into Romanian folk music and its influence on his compositions. Since September 2013 she has been a junior research fellow at the Bartók Archives of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences’ Institute for Musicology.

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FERENC JÁNOS SZABÓ

Lajtha László fiatalkori zongoraművei

 

The first published compositions of László Lajtha were written for the piano. These early pieces amount to almost three- quarters of all his works for piano solo. They are linked to each other by the choice of instrument, a firm musical resolution and their composition style. After these works László Lajtha’s interest was attracted towards chamber music genres; his homogeneous style gradually changed. According to the literature on Lajtha, the early piano works are devoid of any impact; their style is individual, but was later abandoned by the composer. In spite of this Lajtha could not remain free of the style of his models, mainly Béla Bartók. The impact of Bartók can be felt not only in the sonority of these works, but also in their particular details. In this study I examine Lajtha’s piano works written before 1918, the personality and pianistic peculiarities of the young composer, and I demonstrate the unavoidable profound influence of Bartók on the young Lajtha.

 

Ferenc János Szabó (1985, Pécs) musicologist, pianist. Secondary studies in choir conducting, composition and piano in Pécs and Budapest. Graduated with honours from the Ferenc Liszt Music Academy as a piano pupil of Jenô Jandó and Sándor Falvai in 2008. In the same year he started doctoral studies for DLA degree in piano playing and PhD in musicology (supervisor for both: Anna Dalos), and a master course in chamber music at Kunstuniversität Graz. In the first half of 2011 he worked as a contributor at the Liszt Ferenc Memorial Museum and Research Center. Since September of the same year he has been a junior researcher at the Institute for Musicology (Research Centre for the Humanities, The Hungarian Academy of Sciences). He has won several prizes at international competitions as the pianist of the Piano Trio „Trio Duecento Corde”. He holds the Annie Fischer scholarship. His research field as a musicologist is the history of Hungarian sound recording and Hungarian operatic performance. He has given papers and published studies on these themes and on Liszt. Since July 2012 he has been a member of the Archives and Research Group of 20th–21st Century Hungarian Music at the Institute for Musicology; since March 2013 he has been a piano accompanist at the Ferenc Liszt Music Academy in the classes of Éva Marton and Andrea Meláth. From September 2013 he holds a postdoctoral scholarship of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences.

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